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Museum of Fine Arts Houston - Kinder Building

2020 Vanceva World of Color Awards - Exterior Category Winner

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Categories:
Facciate , Cultura , Nord america

Location: Houston, Texas, U.S.A
Completion: 2020
Architect(s): Steven Holl Architects | www.stevenholl.com
Glass Laminator: ShenZhen ShenNanYi Glass Product Co., Ltd | www.shennanyi.com
Featured products: Vanceva interlayers 0009
Photo credit: ® Richard Barnes and ® Olaf Schmidt

Steven Holl Architects designed a showpiece for the expansion of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston—Kinder Building in Houston, Texas, U.S.A. The entire structure is encased in white glass, from a canopied entrance to clerestory windows to a double-layered façade of laminated glass tubes over an opaque weather wall. Translucent interlayers fine-tune the desired light transmission so that the museum’s art is enjoyed in natural sunlight yet remains protected from damaging UV rays.

ShenNanYi fabricated the ventilated façade of approximately 1,150 translucent glass tubes in front of opaque walls and large punched windows with a steel substructure featuring an invisible structural glazing for support. The glass tubes are acid etched with four translucent Vanceva Arctic Snow PVB interlayers that precisely control the amount of daylight passing through them while providing a high degree of safety.

The design’s absence of color is not lost on WOCA juror Benjamin Wright, who said this about the museum, “As an aesthetic maximalist it seems somewhat contrary to award a color award to a monochromatic white building. But in this case, the architects and fabricators have used the shape and nature of the glass to optimal effect. The challenge of lighting a museum with natural light cannot be understated, and I look forward to visiting this work in person and exploring the building and collections.”